Category Archives: gallery

Sara Magenheimer > Soap Opera Pop Music

Dec 12th – Jan 24th 2014

Reception > 12.12.14 > 5-8pm

Reception > 12.12.14 > 5-8pm

Document is pleased to present “Soap Opera Pop Music”, a selection of image and text based works by New York based artist Sara Magenheimer.

A particular confluence from earlier this year:

I was reading Blaise Cendrars’ poems. I wrote a poem for each of the titles in his poem “16. Titles.”

I was reading Michael McClure’s poems – I Iike his performative linguistic physicality, both sonically and graphically.

I was introduced to a letterpress. Each piece of lead type was a sculptural form dictated by the letter, punctuation mark or dingbat it depicted. Arranging them on a surface created a landscape of text.

I was shooting video and still photos of object arrangements in my studio, rocks that I’d collected and painted different colors, sponges, earplugs, display hands, and ceramics.

I visited Brancusi’s studio in Paris. Encased in glass, it felt like a sort of diorama in a natural history museum. I saw his photographic equipment alongside his sculptural works, in multiple, and thought about representation, repetition of form, and objects’ performative qualities before a camera lens.

My studio evolved into a set in which an actor, objects, and photographs performed for the camera. The text I was writing turned into letterpress arrangements, turned into collages with photographs.

A relationship to an oblique narrative runs through my work; references to things outside of the work connect to an unknown social or cultural context. The work accesses narrative potential and emotional energy in a constant vacillation between specific references (Chris Montez, an earplug, a hand) and ambiguity (ADD A MARK, an abstract blob of clay), functionality (a period acts like a period) and abstraction (a period is a circle, a dot, a shape, the sound “ooo”.)

It’s said that Cendrars’ work evoked photographic impressions, cinematic effects of montage and rapidly changing imagery, while McClure famously performed a reading of his work for caged lions at the SF Zoo. In my work, words are always the shape of the letters that comprise them, the sound of their articulation, as well as what they mean. Sound is always a vibration of molecules, as well as a catalyst for emotion when organized into a melody. The physical embodiment of linguistic utterance as performed by material is at play.

Sara Magenheimer is an artist based in upstate NY. Recent exhibitions include Chapter NY, 247365 Gallery, Cleopatra’s, NY. Recent screenings include The New York Film Festival, The Kitchen, New York; Brooklyn Academy of Music, Brooklyn, NY; The Cave, Detroit, MI; SiteWork, Chapel Hill, NC; MOMA, Portland, OR; The Living Art Museum, Reykjavik, Iceland; and Meet Factory, Prague, Czech Republic. Since 2012 she has performed at Recess, MOMA P.S.1, Issue Project Room, Canada Gallery, and the Performa 13 Biennial. Her collaborative project, Bloopers, received commissions from Triple Canopy and EMPAC, at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. She was named one of Blouin Art Info and Modern Painters Top 25 Artists to Watch in 2014, and was the recipient of a 2014 Rema Hort Mann Foundation Emerging Artist Grant.

Greg Stimac > Middle Gray

Oct 24th – Dec 6th 2014

Reception > 10.24.14 > 5-8 pm

Reception > 10.24.14 > 5-8 pm

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Sierra Nevada(I-80 West), 2014 (13.25

Sierra Nevada(I-80 West), 2014 (13.25" H x 17.5" W) Selenium Toned Silver Gelatin Print

North Coast, 2014 (12.25

North Coast, 2014 (12.25" H x 16.75" W) Selenium Toned Silver Gelatin Print

MountLee(Hollywood), 2014 ( 12.5

MountLee(Hollywood), 2014 ( 12.5" H x 17" W) Selenium Toned Silver Gelatin Print

Salt Flats, 2014 (12.5

Salt Flats, 2014 (12.5" H x 16.75" W) Selenium Toned Silver Gelatin Print

Pacific, 2014 (12.25

Pacific, 2014 (12.25" H x 16.25" W) Selenium Toned Silver Gelatin Print

Hasting Cutoff(Fort Bridger), 2014 (12

Hasting Cutoff(Fort Bridger), 2014 (12" H x 16.75" W) Selenium Toned Silver Gelatin Print

Great Divide(East), 2014 ( 6

Great Divide(East), 2014 ( 6" H x 17.75 W) Selenium Toned Silver Gelatin Print

Great Divide(West), 2014 (6

Great Divide(West), 2014 (6" H x 17.75" W) Selenium Toned Silver Gelatin Print

Stock #1, 2014 (23.25

Stock #1, 2014 (23.25" H x 5" W x 1.5" D)

Stock #2, 2014 (23.5

Stock #2, 2014 (23.5" H x 5.25" W x 1.75" D)

Stock #3, 2014 (21.25

Stock #3, 2014 (21.25" H x 5.5" W x 1.5" D)

Stock #4, 2014 (23.25

Stock #4, 2014 (23.25" H x 5.25" W x 1.75" D)

Stock #5, 2014 (24

Stock #5, 2014 (24"H x 5.5"W x 1.75"D)

Document is pleased to present Middle Gray, a selection of eight black and white silver gelatin photograms and five wooden sculptures by California-based artist Greg Stimac. Together, the works in Middle Gray examine the firearm craftsmanship of the early American West and the traditions of capturing the frontier in photographs.

To craft the photographic works, Stimac uses Google Street View to re-construct locations in the darkroom by way of cut cardboard layers and “burning and dodging” techniques. In utilizing this process, Stimac is able to represent almost any landscape, vantage point, and time of day, while presenting deceptive trompe l’oeil representations through the traces of rough edges and all too-perfect gradients. In Great Divide (East) and Great Divide (West) Stimac simply reverses his cardboard “negative,” looking west into a sunset in one and east at pre-dawn in the other– perhaps suggesting a glance back after a slow night’s journey.

Stimac brings into focus the intensity of being sublimated by the sublime landscape. The photograms which contain bright or dark horizon lines remind us that we don’t have the entire picture or context for this image. We become engulfed in the direction we look, spurring an anxiety that we have been dropped off in a landscape where the foreground is unclear— a quiet, unconquered territory. Presented a virgin space devoid of contemporary landmarks we become hopeful that we are heading west towards the unmanifested coast and out of the valley, which confines our visual window.

Perhaps neutered weapons prepared for our imaginary journey, the sculptures in this exhibition originate from black walnut gun stocks, stacked, reduced, and shifted from their intended use. They cannibalize one another, muting themselves into stoic representations that destabilize their steadying function for a marksman. Stimac scavenged the hardwood butts from a Northern California gunstock manufacturer and used them to heat a cabin during the time he produced this work. In that isolated setting, Stimac found himself attracted to the hardwood materials he discovered and the ways they aesthetically rhyme with land and flesh. Standing in as darkened landmarks, they caution the limitations and dangers of traversing the wilderness. These forms appear as abstracted bodies and inverted vertical horizons, echoed in the silhouettes of the photogram ridge lines. These shapes, conceived of across the sea, are again used to form the territory of the American West.

GREG STIMAC (American, b. 1976) lives and works in California. He received his B.F.A. from Columbia College Chicago in 2005 and his M.F.A. from Stanford University in 2013. Past exhibitions include Worlds Away: New Suburban Landscapes, which began at The Walker Museum of Art, Minneapolis and traveled to the Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh and USA Today, at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, an exhibition of works from their permanent collection. His most recent group exhibitions include Phantoms in the Dirt at the Museum for Contemporary Photography, Chicago (2014) and The 7 Borders at the Kentucky Museum of Art and Craft (2013). Stimac has had solo exhibitions at The Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago and White Flag Projects in St. Louis, Missouri, 2010. His work is in the permanent collections of the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago; UBS, Chicago; the Wieland Collection, Atlanta; and the Ruttenberg Collection, Chicago, among others.

Christalena Hughmanick and Sterling Lawrence > Form Without a Room

Sept 5th – Oct 18th 2014

Reception > 9.4.14 > 5-8pm

Reception > 9.4.14 > 5-8pm

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Wall Rack 1.1, 2014

Wall Rack 1.1, 2014

Document is pleased to present Form Without a Room, a collaborative exhibition of new works by Christalena Hughmanick and Sterling Lawrence.

Christalena Hughmanick and Sterling Lawrence’s collaborative works use rejected Burberry raincoat fabric in the form of moving blankets as a framing device. The photographic images housed within explore abstracts, a fragmented index of information from the beginning of known documented knowledge pertaining to surgical knots. Suspended knot braces become the support for sculptural clay forms, which are reminiscent of the body. Moving blankets deprived of their imagined utility have become the framing units for studies of surgical knots. These knots have three origins of intended use but the focus has been placed on how the knots hold a patient in position.

Christalena Hughmanick currently lives and works in Chicago. Hughmanick’s practice utilizes performance, photographs, textile and sculpture. Her practice continually asks how the value of a thing shifts when it meets a body and attempts to make tangible the space between what is sought after and what is found. Christalena has an MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and has exhibited in group shows at the Kinsey Institute SoFA Gallery in Bloomington, IN; A.P.E. Gallery in Northampton, MA, SOIL Gallery in Seattle, WA; Sullivan Galleries in Chicago; and Western Exhibitions in Chicago.

Sterling Lawrence is an artist living and working in Chicago. Lawrence works between image and objects in tied connections through installation. Relations between objects are complicated by their imagined and therefore suggested utility, which is often exaggerated or muted. The temporal nature of of these works are distressed through their relationship within the networks that they produce. Sterling Lawrence has had solo exhibitions with Devening Projects, Chicago; Tony Wight Gallery, Chicago; and has been included in group exhibitions at Scotty Enterprises,Berlin; Soloway, NY; Columbia College, Chicago; Devening Projects, Chicago; and New Capital via Forever and Always, Chicago

Exhibition Brochure Link